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Reply to Kalinkat et al.: Smallest terrestrial vertebrates are highly imperiled

  1. Douglas J. McCauleyg
  1. aGlobal Trophic Cascades Program, Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331;
  2. bSchool of Life and Environmental Sciences, Centre for Integrative Ecology, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3125, Australia;
  3. cSchool of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia;
  4. dSchool of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195;
  5. eInternational Union for Conservation of Nature, Species Survival Commission, Gland 1196, Switzerland;
  6. fConservation Programmes, Zoological Society of London, London NW1 4RY, United Kingdom;
  7. gDepartment of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106

Kalinkat et al. (1) discuss the biodiversity crisis in their reply to our article “Extinction risk is most acute for the world’s largest and smallest vertebrates” (2). We agree with Kalinkat et al. (1) that small freshwater species tend to have elevated extinction risk, an issue that we highlight in our paper (2). Specifically, 41% (36 of 87) of freshwater vertebrate species with body masses ≤ 0.001 kg are listed as threatened compared with 29% (1,578 of 5,428) threatened for …

?1To whom correspondence should be addressed. Email: bill.ripple{at}oregonstate.edu.

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